COVID-19 Antibodies Test Kits

Testing performed through traditional blood draw or dried blood format to detect the presence of antibodies from natural exposure to coronavirus or vaccination.

Your Immunity Pathway

STEP 2: TEST FOR ANTIBODIES

If you’ve been recently vaccinated against COVID-19, that’s a significant first step accomplished!

A post-vaccination antibodies test sets you on a path forward to reduce your anxiety and concerns about your level of resistance against the SARS-CoV-2 virus causing COVID-19

Safely Re-Engage in Life

Answering these four questions and getting a positive response will enable you to reclaim more confidently your social freedoms and safely re-engage in life because of your immunity against COVID-19.

Did I make any antibodies?

Let’s get tested.

Some people’s immune system do not respond well to vaccinations, especially those who are more elderly or immunocompromised

Do I have enough antibodies?

Let’s do a count.

Although you might find antibodies, it’s critical to make sure there is a high quantity of immunoglobulins in your body.

Are my antibodies effective against SARS-CoV-2 virus?

Let’s test its strength.

Lab testing can confirm the binding strength or ‘avidity’ of your antibodies to the virus spike protein and neutralize it from attacking its host.

Will my antibodies work against the new variant strains?

Let’s test its specificity.

Neutralization testing will determine if your antibodies can specifically prevent variant strains from attaching to it’s host.

And if you discover that your immunity response is sub-optimal or not strong against some variants, that’s manageable because you now know your risks. Continue to wear your mask and maintain social distance until you can get a booster. Your physician will be able to best advise you on next steps.

Self-Test for COVID-19 Antibodies

Second Generation Antibodies Testing

Using a small blood sample, this post-vaccination antibody laboratory-based test helps determine if your immune system has developed antibodies after natural infection or vaccination against the SARS-CoV-2 virus spike protein.

You can perform this test yourself using a self-test kit to collect a few drops of blood and send it to the laboratory* for processing.

Our laboratory partner is located in British Columbia and is fully accredited to perform this antibody test. This test has been shown to be equally sensitive and reliable when compared to a standard blood test.

Current antibodies testing does not focus on the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and therefore cannot determine immunity created as a result of vaccination.

We offer the ‘best in class’ test because it not only detects the presence of antibodies specific for the spike protein of SARS CoV-2 virus but importantly, also allows to determine whether or not the detected antibodies have neutralizing activity, potentially conferring protection from COVID-19.

This blood test has Full Accreditation for “Microbiology – SARS CoV-2 Antibody Assay” by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia’s Diagnostic Accreditation Program using Sierra SPR-32 for Accredited BC Neuroimmunology Laboratory effective April 1, 2021.

The antibody test developed by BC Neuroimmunology (BCNI) Laboratory is based on the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology, a sophisticated nanotechnology platform that offers advantages compared to ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), the current standard for assay creation.

The current version of the ProMIS-BCNI antibody test achieves 99.90% sensitivity and 99.50% specificity for SARS CoV-2, the novel coronavirus causing COVID-19 and can be used to detect immune exposure to the virus with a validation study comparison with 135 blinded samples. To date, the test is being used for research with BCCDC and the Canada COVID task force on thousands of samples.

Once the collection device containing dried blood spots arrives at the BC Neuroimmunology Laboratory, the dried blood sample is reconstituted by adding a buffered solution.

Source: ImmunSafe Inc website
Adapted from: J Chem Educ. 2010 Jul; 87(7): 742–746.
Source: BC Neuroimmunology Laboratory

SELF-TEST KITS AVAILABLE SOON

Self-Test Blood Spot Collection

What’s Involved?

STEP 1

Order and receive your at-home test kit

STEP 2

Collect and ship your samples to the lab

STEP 3

Get results in the Immunity Passport App

Your kit will contain all the necessary supplies for self-collection in the comfort of your own home. The test only requires you to fill 5 circles with 2 drops of blood in each circle. You will collect your blood sample using the paper blot included in your kit.

VIEW HOW TO VIDEO

How the Antibodies Self-Test Kit Works

How to Decide What Kit is Right for You?

BASIC
Antibodies
Test Kit

If you only want to know how much antibodies you have against the original COVID-19 virus and two variant strains, choose BASIC.

COMING SOON

STANDARD Antibodies
Test Kit

In addition to the Basic, and if you also want to know how well your antibodies work to neutralize them, then upgrade to STANDARD.

COMING SOON

PREMIUM Antibodies
Test Kit

In addition to the Standard, and if you also want to understand how strong your antibodies bind to the virus to ensure neutralization and to test more variant strains, select PREMIUM.

COMING SOON

PREMIUM PLUS Antibodies
Test Kit

This product includes TWO PREMIUM test kits. Do one test now and the second test after your vaccination series. Must be used in sequence by the same individual.

COMING SOON

Effective antibodies need to do two things

Your lab test will determine if your antibodies can neutralize the various strains of COVID-19 viruses.

The sample is processed at BC Neuroimmunology Laboratory, in Vancouver Canada, for Canadian samples by its affiliate, North West Pathology in Bellingham, Washington, for USA samples. Results are generally available within ten business days. The patient will be notified to review the report on a secure privacy-compliant portal.

If you register your test kit through the Immunity Passport App, the report will be uploaded there.

Anatomy of the SARS-CoV-2 Virus

Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). The novel coronavirus now known as the SARS-CoV-2 is a new strain which has not previously been identified in humans.
The core protein of SARS-CoV-2 is the N protein (Nucleocapsid protein), which is a protein component located inside the virus and is often used as a tool for diagnosis of coronaviruses.

LEARN MORE: SARS-COV-2 VIRUS AND ANTIBODIES

From a naturally acquired COVID-19 infection from the community, our immune system develops antibodies against both the spike protein (S-protein) and nucleocapsid protein (N-protein) portions of the virus.

In Wave 1 and Wave 2 of the pandemic, most laboratory and rapid cartridge antibodies testing platforms focused on detecting recent natural infection by identifying antibodies against the less mutagenic N-protein.

In contrast, COVID-19 vaccines contain only some components of the S-protein to stimulate an antibody response.

To detect antibodies triggered by vaccination, we identify antibodies against the COVID-19 S-protein.

An immune response can be detected a few days or weeks after individuals have been infected by or received a vaccine against COVID-19.

Presently, the 2020/21 COVID-19 vaccines appear to offer some immunity against the  wild type and some newer SARS-CoV-2 variant strains first discovered in the UK (B.1.1.7), in Brazail (P.1) and South Africa (B.1.351).

Studies of vaccine efficacy show antibodies being present soon after the first vaccine dose. The second shot serves as a booster for the body to continue to mount an antibody response.

Today, we cannot conclude that long-term immunity against COVID-19 exists after one round of vaccinations. As variant strains evolve, we will likely need additional vaccinations against new strains to minimize the risk of getting sick again.

The presence and later absence of antibodies may not mean that all immunity has been lost as there is evidence that our body’s immune system has a ‘memory’ of antibodies against strains we’ve been infected with or exposed to via vaccination.

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